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Adam1988

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2012 3:25 pm    Post subject: Starting off Reply with quote

Hi there. I'm new to fly fishing and am looking to have a few lessons to get me going. Iv been a few times but have not yet got my own rod and reel as not sure what to start off with. I'll be fishing lakes to start off with and I live in Kent (Maidstone) if anyone has any information of one to one tuition that would be of help. Or just what type of rod / reels to go for. I don't want to just get cheap gear as I want it to last.
Kind regards
Adam.
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BlankDay
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2012 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello mate and welcome.

A quick Google showed one or two tackle shops in Maidstone where I'm sure get some good advice. One other piece of advice you probably won't get is not to let them fleece you initially, or talk you into buying tackle you may or may be able to afford. There will be soooo much time for that later.

Register to a tackle emporium and you'll receive magazines with gear, usually with a short description of their intended use.

I get my catalogue and stuff from the Glasgow Angling Centre, but there many more out there. John Norris I have received orders from and they're quuite smart at shipping. Give them a phone or e-mail and I'm sure they'll be only too happy to help.

Best luck.

BD
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Chris
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Adam,
What is your budget for getting started?
Chris
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Lighthouse
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 8:55 am    Post subject: Re: Starting off Reply with quote

Adam1988 wrote:
Hi there. I'm new to fly fishing and am looking to have a few lessons to get me going. Iv been a few times but have not yet got my own rod and reel as not sure what to start off with. I'll be fishing lakes to start off with and I live in Kent (Maidstone) if anyone has any information of one to one tuition that would be of help. Or just what type of rod / reels to go for. I don't want to just get cheap gear as I want it to last.
Kind regards
Adam.


Hi Adam,

If you follow this link it will give you details of qualified instructors in your area -

http://www.gameanglinginstructors.co.uk/index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=usersList&Itemid=201&limitstart=0&search=&cbsecuritym3=cbm_6b292ee0_751fdb33_e675b0483fef261f6abe2d5b4d83b4bd&name=&cb_town=&cb_county=Kent&cb_country=&cb_gaiamentor=&cb_gaiaassessor=

Once you've contacted and met an instructor, talked about the sort of fishing you'll be doing and where you'll be fishing, he /she will be able to give you sound advice on suitable tackle.

Please feel free to contact me by PM if you'd like any further details,

Paul
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KZ
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adam - you're going about this the right way!
Casting instruction is money well spent early on, and comes with the bonus of being able to try a few different rods and get tackle and fishing advice whilst you're at it.
If you want casting tuition there are a few good instructors not too far from you. I'd personally recommend Mike Heritage in Ashford highly. He's also heavily involved with the BFCC. You can contact him through his blog here:

Mike Heritage

Once your casting is in order you can think about fishing instruction. I'd suggest getting out with one of the guys who guide and teach on Bewl - it's your local reservoir, and lessons learned there will stand you in good stead on others , small and large. I believe Vince Brooks does some guiding on Bewl, and Rob Barden does too, as well as casting instruction.
There details can be got from the fishing lodge, info here:

Bewl Water

*Hey* I see there's a beginner's course running this weekend at Bewl - that would tick a lot of boxes for you - well worth giving them a call.
There's a fair tackle shop there too, and no end of advice. Rob Barden would sort you out.

In terms of tackle - try before you buy. Learn to cast before you try.
Remember too - a rod that casts a loooong way isn't always the rod that suits you, or your fishing.
Set a budget, spend most of it on the rod, and leave a decent chunk of it for three lines and a reel with two spare spools.

Have fun!
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Adam1988

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all the replies. I will look into bewl water. It's only 15 mins away from my house. I'm looking to get a rod and paying around £100 maybe a little more if I need to. Iv looked at a lot of different rods and makes and not sure what I should go for. Iv been told that about 9 foot rod and 6" is best for what I'm looking to do. Does this sound ok? And is there a type of rod / make I should look to get or to stay away from?

Thanks again.
Adam
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Chris
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Adam,
A 9' or 9'6 rod is good for bank fishing. If you want to fish from a boat then a 10' rod is a bit better. Obviously there is a compromise somewhere along the line so a 9'6 would be a good choice.

A #6 #7 (6 or 7 weight) rod will suit your needs well.

Chris
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KZ
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

9'6" is the length of choice for those who want one rod that covers all circumstances.
#7 rods are the "go to" choice but I would choose a #6 personally. Lighter and easier on the casting arm, but still plenty of backbone. You would be in a minority though - #7 is the most popular. It's a good starting point, and due to popularity you can pick up some bargains.
Buying new is always a good idea with rods in my opinion... I've had too many second hand ones explode even though they looked okay. Choose your brand wisely and they'll often replace broken rods for a small admin fee (had that from Scierra, Airflo and Bloke rods in the past).
In terms of brand - big name brands aren't always the best value for money, and they're all well over £100.
I have excellent sub £100 rods from Scierra, Airflo, and recall that ChrisN on this forum was selling some very good rods at that sort of price not too long ago. No vested interest there - Chris knows well enough that I'd say they were crap if that was the case, but they were bloody good and far better than rods costing twice the price!

Most of the big online retailers have decent rods on offer at some time - they all seem to have "sales" all the time (20% off so you buy one more perhaps???).

Fishtec and Glasgow Angling Centre or whatever they are now called are both good sources for these.
Like I said though - learn to cast properly and try a few first. I got a real doozer of a floppy awful heavy seven weight for my first rod, and that was on the advice of an old chap at a trout water. Nice guy, but obviously shrewd enough to offload a ten year old new rod on me.

In terms of what to avoid... there will be a lot of people who agree when I say *NEVER* buy an Airflo floating line. Even if it's new and improved an a super special offer thrown in free. If that comes up just say - no thanks, I'll have an airflo sinker. Their intermediate lines are good, sinking lines some of the best out there. Beats me how the hell they can consistently make such a bloody awful range of floating lines for decades whilst leading the charge in terms of quality fast sinkers.

In terms of rods - look at the action. It is "fashionable" these days to have fast tip actioned rods. They are good in some situations and generally are the weapon of choice for serious casters - those who want to cast to the horizon, or compete in distance casting. Also good for hauling fish in fast on strong leaders.
Useless if you're fishing smaller dries on light tippets, as they have so little flex a sudden lunge can lead to a snap off... so match your rod to your casting style and fishing situation.

I would suggest that a mid to tip actioned rod (which means it bends a little more in the mid section as well as the tip) is a better choice for a beginner - good for casting, and more forgiving of sudden lunges from fish (or a double hookup, which can happen surprisingly often if you're in the right place at the right time at Bewl).

Get yourself a couple of casting lessons under your belt and let us know, I'm sure one or two of us would be happy to meet up with you on Bewl or another Kent water and have a morning or arvy fishing. If we get a few along it's another opportunity to try out a few different rods, and pick peoples brains about fishing waters, spots, and techniques.

Spoke to a fishing buddy last night and he recommended the fly fishing "school" at Bewl. Personally I'd spend a little more and see if I could have a day with Rob Barden, as he would also give you a good grounding in bank and boat angling and more importantly - where to find the fish!

I'm in the midst of a couple of weeks with a fair bit of free time, so if you sort yourself out pronto I'll hook up with you and bring a few rods along for you to try.
Cheers,
Kev
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Adam1988

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks kev that is a lot of help. Iv been on fishtec website and got a airflo rod for £120 which I didn't think is to bad. Is the airflo reels any good? I need to get my self a reel now.

Thanks.
Adam
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Chris
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The reel is really just to hold your line when fishing in the UK for trout. No point spending lots on a fancy reel with a good drag system as you simply won't use it in the UK
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KZ
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chris is spot on. Most of them are uneccesary "bling" in my opinion, and often very heavy.

I do have an airflo reel that I got as a deal with the 40+ rod and a bunch of lines. It's good. Never used the drag, it's too good for the job really.

Personally I'd go for something like an Okuma Airframe. You can pick them up new, with reel case and two spare spools for very little money from the big online stores, and on ebay. That'll cover your floating, intermediate and sinking lines and the spare spools are cheap if you want to get different sinking speeds as you develop.
If I had to choose a single sinking line it would be a di5. (sinks at 5 inces per second, so you can count down to depth before retrieving).

The airflo sinking lines are good. The "sixth sense" di5 would be a good choice.
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KZ
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Floating line choice - I don't know, I'm not really up to speed on what's "in" these days. For me I like the snowbee floating lines, and the Scientific anglers mastery ones. Cortland 444 are also good.

Chris N was selling lines a while back and his floating line is very good. Not tried any others, but the floater is still going strong and in good nick after three or four years abuse in saltwater.

If you are sorting yourself out a bunch of lines and want to save faffing about and money then it has to be said that you won't go far wrong with Pitsford Pirates' lines. I'm particularly fond of his intermediate.
Both PP and ChrisN can be got hold of via the forum.

Internet forums are, by and large, full of people wanting to sell you stuff, in addition to lots of advice (mostly good, some not so good - but that's subjective)... I confess to getting weary of it but then I also know that the guys on here that I speak of wouldn't still be selling stuff if it wasn't good kit, good value and done with a good level of service.

I'd also have had a far slower, more tortuous, expensive and frustrating flyfishing journey myself if it wasn't for the advice, knowledge and friendships I've made through fora.
My intricate knowledge of agonising hangovers also improved exponentially after falling in with certain reprobates on socials.
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