The Complete Fisher Forum Forum Index The Complete Fisher Forum
Social, Fly, Coarse and Sea Fishing with Fly Tying
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   Referral CenterReferral Center    CalendarCalendar    RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in   ChatChat    Fisheries DatabaseFisheries   Donate    RSS Feed
http://fishskb.co.uk/index.php?route=product/category&path=146

Wormery
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic       The Complete Fisher Forum Forum Index -> Coarse Fishing Discussion -> General Coarse
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Fryfishing
1,000 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 26 Apr 2006
Posts: 1575
Location: Watford Hertfordshire

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2020 8:59 am    Post subject: Wormery Reply with quote

After reading Wylye's comment re bait for course fishing I thought you maybe interest in the wormery I made.
I was buying tubs of worms from my local tackle shop and using them on the dropshot or as general bait and at the end of the day putting what was left in the fridge for the next trip out.
Then with a surplus of left overs I thought “why not create a wormery” and put the leftovers in that (bearing in mind I do not have a garden). I drilled some holes in a plastic box with a lid filled it with strips of newspaper, sprinkled it with water and threw in the left over worms then place the bin in my cellar.
After a few weeks I found that the worms were breeding ( lots of small white worms) so I started to feed them with coffee grains, tea bag leafs and vegetables trimmings. This produced an absolute boom in growth and breeding to the extent that I now have a surplus of worms.
I was then given a three tiered commercially made worm farm, my worms were then transferred into this and I put it in the back yard. It has been a great success. It has also meant that my food waste going in the bin has been reduced by at least 75%.
_________________
Floating Lines, buzzers, nymphs, stick floats, maggots and throwing lures at bitey things.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Allrounder
Moderator
User is Offline


Joined: 09 Apr 2006
Posts: 5172
Location: Somerset. UK

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2020 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A useful thing to have if you use a lot of worms and my garden composter came in very useful when I did a lot of coarse fishing. My other trick was to take a torch out at night to search for lobworms on the grass verge out side my house. Very Happy

Alan
_________________
Member of ...
The Angling Trust
BRFFA
B.A.S.S.
Pike Fly Fishing Association

If you see me on the bank, say hello... from a safe distance! Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Phoogle Map
wylye
250 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 02 Apr 2014
Posts: 498

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2020 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Allrounder wrote:
A useful thing to have if you use a lot of worms and my garden composter came in very useful when I did a lot of coarse fishing. My other trick was to take a torch out at night to search for lobworms on the grass verge out side my house until I got arrested as a peeping tom, Very Happy

Sorry Alan. Couldn't resist!

Alan
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liked by: Allrounder
tenet
1,000 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 1969

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2020 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I had a salmon rod on the Wye back in the late 70's thru the 80's lobworms were a premium. Would creep about the common at night after rain picking lobs from the grass. You had to be quick as they would shoot back down their holes in a flash. I seem to remember a chap selling them at 10p each from the classified section of T&S.

Many years later a pal showed me how he harvested his lobs for fishing on the Lune. He would insert a long screwdriver into the ground where the grass had been cultivated and would wiggle it vigorously about. As if by magic the worms pop out of the ground. He seems to think that the vibrations simulated that of a mole and the worms were making good their escape. Don't know if that is true but it certainly works. Smile

Sadly the Wye salmon catch is but a shadow of its former self and bait is no longer permitted for the pursuit of salmon but some of the barbel boys do (ahmm) accidentally catch salmon when ledgering worms.

Edit : an unintended consequence of worming for salmon was eels. My Italian pal Pino insisted that I bring any big ones home for him and even supplied me with a suitable bucket.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swampydick
250 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 370

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2020 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doug how successful were you on the wye in the 70s ledgering worm?
We used mustard powder mixed with water in a watering can then watered a area and the worms popped up pretty quickly, then were gathered and used for rayballing which was fun, supprissingly there was lots of people then who had a appetite for eels!
Then eels were a plenty but I feel elvering in the 90s finished them off.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liked by: Allrounder
tenet
1,000 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 1969

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2020 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I fished Lower Symonds Yat for many years which comprised some good fly water along with long featureless pools that lent themselves to spinning with a Wye lead and floating Devon minnow in early season and mepps later on. Worms were not ledgered but free lined with a couple of shot above a big bunch of worms and probably accounted for about 50 or so of the 150/200 fish that the beat took each year. The most exciting method was with a spun prawn using a multiplier (the ghillie used to poo hoo fixed spool reels) with the clutch set very light. When a salmon took you let it run against the clutch and then by use of thumb lock the spool and strike. We fished mainly from a boat which allowed fishing throughout the 21/2 mile of water available. Tragic how the river has declined with the salmon catch for the whole river down to less than 400 fish.
Posted this picture some time ago - taken in the early 80's but time has taken its toll 😊
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liked by: Allrounder
Fryfishing
1,000 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 26 Apr 2006
Posts: 1575
Location: Watford Hertfordshire

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2020 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Happy Days and nice flairs Laughing

A quick note re the wormery, all the worms in there are dendrobena.
Very Happy
_________________
Floating Lines, buzzers, nymphs, stick floats, maggots and throwing lures at bitey things.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
swampydick
250 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 370

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2020 5:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Doug that’s interesting and a monster of a fish, do you think they will come back given the protection and fish breeding projects that are in place also a cleaner river I’m guessing than the 80 s when mining still existed.
Catching a salmon is something I’m going to have to do at some point but dont really want that monkey on my back right now.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tenet
1,000 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 1969

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2020 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of politics at play on the Wye. The Wye and Usk Foundation (WUF) have spent countless millions on the river, and their staff, only to see the salmon runs inexorably decline. The RWGA and the WSA made up from some land owners, ghillies and fishermen put forward proposals regarding semi natural rearing of salmon parr to the smolt stage which looked very exciting but the whole project was binned after just 1 year by NRW and supported by the WUF on the grounds of genetic integrity which is, on the face of it, boxxocks.

There are many factors at play, high seas netting, fish eating birds, pollution by the water companies and possibly sea warming - so to answer your question I cannot see things improving in the short term or even the long term. Just my opinion of course.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wylye
250 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 02 Apr 2014
Posts: 498

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2020 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the risk of going off piste why not require NRW and WUF to guarantee absolutely that the salmon they see spawning on the redds were actually born there. They can't do it. If you take three or four hen salmon and one or two cock fish, strip them and mix the whole lot up in a washing up bowl you are going to get all the genetic diversity you'll ever want.

Finally, it is known that imprinting of "home" waters is done at the smolt stage shortly before the fish goes to sea. Therefore that fish can't have the faintest idea where it was born and if it returns will spawn wherever salmon congregate on suitable gravels. This must happen in "wild" situations as there are many records of salmon turning up in rivers where they have never or rarely been found.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liked by: Allrounder
swampydick
250 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 370

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2020 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess anything that swims in the sea is under pressure, kielder hatchery boasts massive success on the Tyne saying it’s The countries most thriving salmon river so it clearly works.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tenet
1,000 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 1969

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2020 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Certainly in Peter Grey's time the kielder hatchery was a great success much to the chagrin of the EA and others who look upon hatcheries as the devil's spawn. His ideas were dismissed probably due to the fact that he was not a scientist but learnt his craft from experience and observation.
I mentioned semi natural rearing of salmon - the WSA along with some riparian owners formed ponds alongside the main stem of the river with a stream fed by the river running through them. The idea was to introduce Parr from the Wye's hatchery, protect the Parr from predators and once they smolted release them back into the main stem at a suitable time when there was adequate flow. The project was to last 10 years and was run on a voluntary basis so no costs involved. NRW decided that hatcheries should close so the source for Parr disappeared so the project came to an end after just 2 years.
At this time there is no hatchery on the Wye nor any other means of stocking salmon. All efforts have been concentrated on water quality improvement, coppicing and removing obstructions to migration. The vast majority of this work has been done or organized by the WUF at huge costs and and a lot if their funding has come from our taxes by way of the NRW and I believe the EA. As ever these charities(WUF) develop and the accounts show a wage bill of over £500,000 let alone any capital costs. Talk to any regular Wye Fisher or ghillie and they are spitting pins. So there we have it, England's premier salmon river accounting for 5 or 6,000 fish per year reduced to hundreds .
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Allrounder
Moderator
User is Offline


Joined: 09 Apr 2006
Posts: 5172
Location: Somerset. UK

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2020 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not a salmon fisher but I do follow the hatchery debate with interest.

It seems to me that salmon anglers assume that the EA have the same objective as they have but I wonder if this is actually true? For riparian owners and anglers the aim would be a healthy river system supporting as many salmon as possible. However for the EA it might be a healthy catchment to support increased diversity which could eventually include the reintroduction of previously extinct animals like Beavers and Wolves etc with salmon only part of a wider 'rewilding' agenda.

The scientists have provided statistics to suggest that the influence of hatcheries is negligible and point to habitat improvements on the Tyne as the reason for the improved catches. This is refuted by hatchery supporters.

So why not do both, especially if the hatcheries are funded and supported by volunteers at no cost to the EA? Confused

Alan
_________________
Member of ...
The Angling Trust
BRFFA
B.A.S.S.
Pike Fly Fishing Association

If you see me on the bank, say hello... from a safe distance! Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Phoogle Map
Liked by: tenet
wylye
250 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 02 Apr 2014
Posts: 498

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2020 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back in the late 1970's we had the project of returning salmon to the Thames. I as newly into the Water Authority then and based at the Amersham office. I remember spending many hours investigating rivers in my area for their suitability to re-introduce salmon parr. Needless to say there weren't that many but the Chess seemed reasonable enough. We had a delivery of thousands of salmon parr and the three Divisions of the then Thames Water - 5 Areas in total - all met up to collect our allotment of fish at the ungodly hour of 06.00. 12 hours later my colleague and I finally finished unloading and I often wondered how many of the 30,000 we stocked out actually survived having travelled down from Scotland over night before being handed over to us.

Early days though. Subsequent surveys indicated that the Chess was a decent little stream and the fish seemed to be surviving OK.

Gradually, surveys indicated which rivers in the then Thames Conservancy were more suited to the project. Then we had the great day, and I was on my way to the West Country on holiday when I saw a newspaper article that salmon had returned to the Thames. An angler had reported seeing a bloody great silver fish jumping at Molesey Weir so some of the Fisheries team put a boat on the river and BINGO! Salmon there were! Not just one either.

The next couple of years saw saw increasing numbers returning. This led to a programme of fish passes at all the weirs including the 17 on the Kennet. A Thames Salmon Trust was set up to fund the project. Eventually it all foundered due to lack of funds and lack of interest. I was present when the last batch of salmon parr went into the Kennet in 2011 just before I retired. A noble aim that saw the expenditure of millions and resulted in nothing. It was obvious that it was never going to be possible to establish a self-sustaining run of salmon and that was the final nail as it were.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liked by: tenet, Allrounder
tenet
1,000 Post Club
User is Offline


Joined: 15 Jul 2007
Posts: 1969

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2020 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for posting Wylye, I seem to have taken the wormery thread into a totally different area - It was a laudable effort by the EA but i seem to remember that it was more about showing the "world" how clean our rivers were rather than establishing a sustained salmon run.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic       The Complete Fisher Forum Forum Index -> Coarse Fishing Discussion -> General Coarse All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

This board is protected by Phpbbantispam
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group